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Beaded Mouse Ear Tutorial Part 2

This is the 2nd half of the beaded Mickey Ears Tutorial

the good thing about this 2nd half is it applies to wrapping any headband so even if you are not making Mouse Ears you can still use the technique to wrap your headbands with ribbon and give them a new lease on life, or to decorate

 

Beaded Mickey Ears Tutorial Part 1

I have been seeing some gorgeous wire and floral hand made Mickey ears in videos and on Etsy so wanted to put my own spin on them

so here is the first Half of my hand Beaded Mickey Ears Tutorial

Please subscribe to My YouTube channel if you would like more of this kind of tutorial from me

 

New Series on my YouTube Chanel

It is called crafting in bed.
And whilst every care should be taken as this one does include the use of a flame it is actually pretty easy to do (well for me I cannot speak to anyone else)

 

at any rate you can craft this anywhere however due to illness and lack of crafting I wanted to find some things I could easily do in bed so on my worst days I did not feel like I was missing out on at least a little bit of creativity.

Poker Chip Mat Tutorial

This year one of my goals is to post at least a tutorial a Month, I am a bit late with Last Months so here it is.

It is a little tricky at first, however stick with it as once you get the hang of it it is really simple and easy :). It also can be made bigger or smaller depending on your needs.

A great decorative Piece for the Poker, Vegas, or other gambling type themed Party

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Materials:

9 thick plastic poker chips

24 small screw eyes

12 jump rings

Pliers

Awl

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Step 1: Lay out your poker chips into the pattern you want, I have used one colour here however you can easily mix and match your poker chips for a funky patterned look.

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Step 2 Take Your Awl (you can find these really cheap on ebay) and gently poke a hole in your Poker chip. It does not have to be a huge hole but at least enough to start to put your screw eye in.

For corners you need 2 holes one side and one bottom/top depending on position

For the sides you need 3 and for the center you need 4 (this will of course vary depending on how big you are making your mat)

Continue with each poker chip until you have the holes you need.

It pays to have a couple of extra in case of mishaps, also please please go slow and be careful as Awls are very sharp and it is easy to slip if your not paying attention to what your doing.

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Step 3: Put your screw eyes into each hole, I do this just enough so that they stay in, as I find its quicker to have them all in then do the next step

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Step 3: Take your pliers in one hand and your poker chip in the other and twist in your Screw eye’s. I found this a little difficult with some of the screw eyes, so you may need to push down hard with the pliers. The Pliers also save very sore fingers.

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Step 4: Connect your poker chips together. Using your jump rings and starting at the top corner and working on the first two rows then adding in the last one (or more if you are doing a larger Mat)

I stretched the Jump rings first by placing on the nose of my pliers and opening them a little. I also used the pliers to close them again to keep the mat together.

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and viola here is the finished Mat. The great thing about this tutorial is you can so easily adapt it, you can take the basic idea of the screw eyes and thick poker chips to make jewellery, a Poker chip version of a beaded curtain, a chandelier the list is endless of the variations and ways you can use this basic idea.

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Its a Blog Hop Box-a-lope

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First off you should be hopping here from Daisy’s amazing blog

Welcome to my Box-a-lope tutorial I know there are a few of these already online though I just played with my scoreboard to get mine. It may look a little daunting in terms of steps but it really is very simple and I like to make things as easy as possible for each person so that all skill levels can accomplish my tutorials easily.

The best bit about this project its a one sheet of CS one so its great for stretching the budget, cards that are a little to big for a normal envelope or to sneak a few goodies in with your card.

step 1. Using your Martha Stewart score board with the envelope maker in place or a ruler and a pencil. Score your lines on the diagnal at 4.5″ and 5″

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turn and do this on all four sides your CS should have score or pencil lines to look like the ones in this pic

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Step 2: Cut down your corners on what all sides (I always cut the top two flaps off but you can tuck them in if you prefer it really is up to you) Make sure the two you are leaving to create tabs with you cut a small piece out of the end as pictured this will help it sit better.

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Note you can turn your cut off bits into photo corners for other projects very simply the following pics show you how easy it is

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ok back to our box-a-lope

Step 3 Turn your box-a-lope over and decorate your front panel this will make it easier if you want to stamp, emboss or ink your box rather than when it is already made up. You will notice I accidentally did my box sideways which was a decorating error on my part you do not need to do this you can have your box with the flap at the top it is totally up to you.

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Step 4 Add tape as shown to one of the side panels, the whole of your bottom panel and the outside of the little tabs

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Step 5: Stick the tabs to the outer bits of your box-a-lope

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step 6: Stick your side panels to each other being careful to keep the shape (if you have a book or thin box the right size use that to help)

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step 7: Stick the bottom fold over bit panel (I cut a rounded shape into the end of mine you do not have to I just like how it looks better and yes a corner rounder is on my wish list)over the side panels.

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Step 8: Add adhesive to your top panel, fill your box-a-lope with goodies and viola your done πŸ™‚
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As a special give away for this blog hop I am giving the above box-a-lope stuffed full of goodies from my etsy store and some other stash away to one lucky commenter so comment on this post for your chance to win.

It is now time for you to hop on over to Ashley’s awesome blog

Suitcase Box Tutorial (Yes my own unique box tutorial)

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(the pictured suitcase boxes are 5″ wide rather than the 6″ in the tutorial it is explained in the instructions how you can alter the size)

A friend showed me a vintage suitcase that had been turned into a work of scrapbooking art. We were talking and as things go she wanted to figure out how to do the same thing on a smaller scale.

I said I had a few ideas I wanted to try and that I would get back to her and thus this tutorial was born.

This is perfect for the budget crafter as it uses just one sheet of 12 cardstock and the leftover bits are put to use. As well as leaving you with some squares that are perfect for inchies or layout titles and such.

Please do not be daunted by the amount of steps involved once you have made one of these you will discover how easy they are to make and how effective they look.

Materials:

A 12×10” piece of Cardstock in a colour of your choice

A 2”x6” piece of cardstock leftover from your original 12×12 or in a contrasting colour (depending on if you have Distress crackle paint or other acrylic paint to use)

Distress Crackle Paint or a contrasting colour in acrylic

10 brads (optional 26 if you would like all 3 of your corner pieces with a brad)

Ribbon, trim or Thin strips of faux upholstery suede for your straps and handle

2 Buckles (I used pearl ribbon sliders you can however get small buckles off eBay for a more authentic look)

Score board (alternatively a ruler and pencil will work however a score board is the fast simple option)

Strong double sided tape

Optional 1 7/8” x 1 7/8” piece of grungeboard

Multi Medium in Matt

Optional 6”x12” piece of patterned paper

Step 1:

Score your cardstock along the 12” edge at: 1”, 2”, 5”, 6”, 7”, 10” and 11”

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Step 2

Turn your cardstock to the 10” length and score at: 1”, 2”, 8” and 9” (Please note if you want a smaller length to your box trim off extra cardstock and make sure you score at 1” and 2” on both sides by flipping the cardstock around I did this for the 2 boxes with the pattern paper on them to make them a 5” box.)

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Step 3: Cut down the lines of your box along the 12” sides as shown in the picture. Along the edge lines down to the end of your two 1” score lines, please only do the 2nd line on the corners (see step 4 for why you need to do this the L shapes are then recycled into your corner pieces) It should look like this image:

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Step 4:

Cut off your corner pieces in an L shape (each part of the L should be a one inch square so you will end up with 3 of them. Also cut off the 2 extra squares in the middle leaving two one inch squares. Your box should look like this picture

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Step 5: Place tape as shown in the photo: The inside pieces get tape on the flat cardstock that will fold inside the box, the tabs get tape on the rough side or outer side of the cardstock as shown in the following pics

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Step 6 OPTIONAL If you are adding patterned paper to the outside of your box. Score it the same way the 12” side of the cardstock was scored in step one.

Place tape around the top edges of the box and on both sides of all score lines. Stick down your patterned Paper (this method allows for the pattern paper to be adhered not only easily but also in a way that means no bubbles and such later)

Step 7: Fold all your score lines and run a bone folder over them for crispness.

Step 8: Remove the top part of your double stick tape from the β€˜tabs’ (the small 1” squares) and attach them to the piece next to them. As shown in the photo:

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Repeat step 8 until all 8 corners are stuck down giving you your basic box shape

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Step 9: Remove the top layer of your tape from all the long flaps and fold them down (this has the added benefit of making your box a little sturdier)

OPTIONAL: Add your grungeboard strip to the inside of the box hinged bit or place underneath your pp on the outside this will help keep your box in shape. You could also paint it with crackle paint or cover it in felt or faux suede for an added luxury look to your suitcase and adhere it to the bottom (the hinged 2” scored bit that allows your suitcase to be opened and closed)

Step 10: Score your 2”x 6” strip straight down the middle so you have two 1” sides. Turn to the 6” length and then score every 1”. (Please not my pic shows a 12″ strip done the same way you can do this if like me you often loose bits as your making things)

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Step 11: Cut these into L shapes like your corner pieces you should now have 8 of these in total.

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Step 12: Take one of your L shapes and fold over into one square. As shown in the pic

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Step 13: Cut along the diagonal of your square. The best way I can describe this is to make sure you do not cut your β€˜fold’ line and that you’re cutting off the open side of your square.

Repeat this for all 8 squares they will end up looking like a sort of square pac man:

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Step 14: Paint your corner pieces with Distress Crackle paint or acrylic in a contrasting colour. If you chose to use cardstock in a contrasting colour you can skip this step.

Step 15 when dry place a brad in the centre of each corner piece (I use the piece that is in the centre as such) If you want to add brads to all sides do this now to the other two pieces as well.

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Step 16: Paint some multi medium or other adhesive onto the non painted/non presentation side of your corner piece. Stick the triangle that has both of the other triangles attached to the top of the corner of your box (as shown) then stick down the other two triangles over your corner (see the pics below).

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Repeat with all 8 corners.
This is what your box will look like

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Step 17: Cut a strip of faux upholstery suede, ribbon or trim for your handle. Make sure it is a width your happy with.

Place holes for the brads towards the bottom corners of your Handle. Hold the handle to your box where you want it to be and mark the holes.

I used a tapered AWL (one of the benefits of being a bear maker as it is a tool of the trade however I also find it invaluable for scrapbooking as well) to punch the small holes needed in the box.

Add the brads to your handle and put through the holes.

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NOTE: It took me a while to find a way to do the handle that I liked. I make the handle a bit thicker and put the brads down the bottom corners so that it overlaps the top part of the suitcase to look more like a real handle. However this is your suitcase you are free to do your handle how you choose.

Step 18: Measure your ribbon, trim or faux upholstery suede around your box making sure you have enough to go all the way around, with added extra to form your β€˜straps’

Step 19: Using your ribbon, trim or thin strips of faux upholstery suede glue them into your β€˜buckles’ by folding a piece of the end over and gluing it down. Do this for both strips

Step 20: Do up your straps at either end of your suitcase.

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And Viola you did it!!Β  You can now create a mini album or use this as a gift box or decoration. Would also be great for a bon voyage party as party favours. You are only limited by your imagination. I would really love to see your creations if you try this tutorial!

Best of all this really is an economical little project.