Suitcase Box Tutorial (Yes my own unique box tutorial)

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(the pictured suitcase boxes are 5″ wide rather than the 6″ in the tutorial it is explained in the instructions how you can alter the size)

A friend showed me a vintage suitcase that had been turned into a work of scrapbooking art. We were talking and as things go she wanted to figure out how to do the same thing on a smaller scale.

I said I had a few ideas I wanted to try and that I would get back to her and thus this tutorial was born.

This is perfect for the budget crafter as it uses just one sheet of 12 cardstock and the leftover bits are put to use. As well as leaving you with some squares that are perfect for inchies or layout titles and such.

Please do not be daunted by the amount of steps involved once you have made one of these you will discover how easy they are to make and how effective they look.

Materials:

A 12×10” piece of Cardstock in a colour of your choice

A 2”x6” piece of cardstock leftover from your original 12×12 or in a contrasting colour (depending on if you have Distress crackle paint or other acrylic paint to use)

Distress Crackle Paint or a contrasting colour in acrylic

10 brads (optional 26 if you would like all 3 of your corner pieces with a brad)

Ribbon, trim or Thin strips of faux upholstery suede for your straps and handle

2 Buckles (I used pearl ribbon sliders you can however get small buckles off eBay for a more authentic look)

Score board (alternatively a ruler and pencil will work however a score board is the fast simple option)

Strong double sided tape

Optional 1 7/8” x 1 7/8” piece of grungeboard

Multi Medium in Matt

Optional 6”x12” piece of patterned paper

Step 1:

Score your cardstock along the 12” edge at: 1”, 2”, 5”, 6”, 7”, 10” and 11”

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Step 2

Turn your cardstock to the 10” length and score at: 1”, 2”, 8” and 9” (Please note if you want a smaller length to your box trim off extra cardstock and make sure you score at 1” and 2” on both sides by flipping the cardstock around I did this for the 2 boxes with the pattern paper on them to make them a 5” box.)

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Step 3: Cut down the lines of your box along the 12” sides as shown in the picture. Along the edge lines down to the end of your two 1” score lines, please only do the 2nd line on the corners (see step 4 for why you need to do this the L shapes are then recycled into your corner pieces) It should look like this image:

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Step 4:

Cut off your corner pieces in an L shape (each part of the L should be a one inch square so you will end up with 3 of them. Also cut off the 2 extra squares in the middle leaving two one inch squares. Your box should look like this picture

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Step 5: Place tape as shown in the photo: The inside pieces get tape on the flat cardstock that will fold inside the box, the tabs get tape on the rough side or outer side of the cardstock as shown in the following pics

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Step 6 OPTIONAL If you are adding patterned paper to the outside of your box. Score it the same way the 12” side of the cardstock was scored in step one.

Place tape around the top edges of the box and on both sides of all score lines. Stick down your patterned Paper (this method allows for the pattern paper to be adhered not only easily but also in a way that means no bubbles and such later)

Step 7: Fold all your score lines and run a bone folder over them for crispness.

Step 8: Remove the top part of your double stick tape from the ‘tabs’ (the small 1” squares) and attach them to the piece next to them. As shown in the photo:

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Repeat step 8 until all 8 corners are stuck down giving you your basic box shape

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Step 9: Remove the top layer of your tape from all the long flaps and fold them down (this has the added benefit of making your box a little sturdier)

OPTIONAL: Add your grungeboard strip to the inside of the box hinged bit or place underneath your pp on the outside this will help keep your box in shape. You could also paint it with crackle paint or cover it in felt or faux suede for an added luxury look to your suitcase and adhere it to the bottom (the hinged 2” scored bit that allows your suitcase to be opened and closed)

Step 10: Score your 2”x 6” strip straight down the middle so you have two 1” sides. Turn to the 6” length and then score every 1”. (Please not my pic shows a 12″ strip done the same way you can do this if like me you often loose bits as your making things)

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Step 11: Cut these into L shapes like your corner pieces you should now have 8 of these in total.

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Step 12: Take one of your L shapes and fold over into one square. As shown in the pic

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Step 13: Cut along the diagonal of your square. The best way I can describe this is to make sure you do not cut your ‘fold’ line and that you’re cutting off the open side of your square.

Repeat this for all 8 squares they will end up looking like a sort of square pac man:

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Step 14: Paint your corner pieces with Distress Crackle paint or acrylic in a contrasting colour. If you chose to use cardstock in a contrasting colour you can skip this step.

Step 15 when dry place a brad in the centre of each corner piece (I use the piece that is in the centre as such) If you want to add brads to all sides do this now to the other two pieces as well.

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Step 16: Paint some multi medium or other adhesive onto the non painted/non presentation side of your corner piece. Stick the triangle that has both of the other triangles attached to the top of the corner of your box (as shown) then stick down the other two triangles over your corner (see the pics below).

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Repeat with all 8 corners.
This is what your box will look like

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Step 17: Cut a strip of faux upholstery suede, ribbon or trim for your handle. Make sure it is a width your happy with.

Place holes for the brads towards the bottom corners of your Handle. Hold the handle to your box where you want it to be and mark the holes.

I used a tapered AWL (one of the benefits of being a bear maker as it is a tool of the trade however I also find it invaluable for scrapbooking as well) to punch the small holes needed in the box.

Add the brads to your handle and put through the holes.

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NOTE: It took me a while to find a way to do the handle that I liked. I make the handle a bit thicker and put the brads down the bottom corners so that it overlaps the top part of the suitcase to look more like a real handle. However this is your suitcase you are free to do your handle how you choose.

Step 18: Measure your ribbon, trim or faux upholstery suede around your box making sure you have enough to go all the way around, with added extra to form your ‘straps’

Step 19: Using your ribbon, trim or thin strips of faux upholstery suede glue them into your ‘buckles’ by folding a piece of the end over and gluing it down. Do this for both strips

Step 20: Do up your straps at either end of your suitcase.

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And Viola you did it!!  You can now create a mini album or use this as a gift box or decoration. Would also be great for a bon voyage party as party favours. You are only limited by your imagination. I would really love to see your creations if you try this tutorial!

Best of all this really is an economical little project.

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9 thoughts on “Suitcase Box Tutorial (Yes my own unique box tutorial)

  1. Pingback: Kartka ślubna w kształcie kufra | ❤ Heartwork

    • Your most welcome :). You will have to let me know if it is confusing at all as it really is simple but sometimes hard to write these things so others understand. Look forward to seeing your version 🙂

      • Yeah these things are hard to explain, but I find the pictures very good, so I understand how to make it. It may sound a bit complicated but I think everyone will understand when they are in the process of making it. So kind of you to put in all this extra work to share it with the world 😀

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